Monday, January 31, 2011

The Armor Of Contempt: A Book Review

Well, the band is all back together. The Ghosts are one big happy family again, with Gaunt as their Daddy. You would think the book bringing all this back together would be rad, but it turned out sort of meh, at least as far as I am concerned. We'll talk about that in a bit.
Gereon. The backdrop for the earlier novel from this arc, Traitor General. Van Voytz, in need of victories to build morale for his second front, decides to sink a good deal of resources to liberate worlds that had been otherwise ignored. Such as Gereon. The Ghosts are sent on their own objective, to liberate a small town as a base of operations, and reconnect with the pro-Imperial Resistance, and the comrades they left behind. We also follow a very vicious and bewildering battle as experience by Dalin Criid, Gol Kolea's biological son, raised by Sgt. Tona Criid (it's complicated) on his adventures with his training battalion.

Pros:
  • Daemon Tank! Yes, Guant and Co. get involved in a duel with a prowling Daemon possessed tank. The story version of that sentence is just as epic as it sounds.
  • Merrt. Everyone's favorite bionic jawed Tanith ex-sniper goes along with Dalin for the ride of his life. I liked him in his earlier appearance in Straight Silver, and I like him better after The Armor of Contempt.
  • Greater Daemon! Yes, in the Dalin half of the story, a Psyker Battle Squad takes on a tank killing Greater Daemon. While we don't get to watch the whole battle unfold, we get to see enough of it to know it's going to be righteous.
Cons:
  • Story In Two Halves. Again. Do I have to reiterate my feelings on this?
  • Deaths. Two pretty important characters either die or disappear in this. Again, this is for people who don't like for that to happen. Not too bad this time as far as I am concerned.
  • Anticlimactic. This story ends with a bit of a shrug and an 'Eh, whatever.' In both halves of the story, you walk away with a feeling like you don't remember why reading this one was so important. I got to the last page and went, 'Umm, that's the end?' 

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